BACKYARD BROADCASTING, LOCAL NEWS FEB 9, 2022

THREATENING WOMEN WITH A BASEBALL BAT

After he threatened harm on two women with a metal baseball bat, a Williamsport man faces charges. As reported by Sun Gazette, Fitzgerald Robinson, during a domestic disturbance at his residence on Jan 22, allegedly chased two women from his residence.  Robinson had a preliminary hearing yesterday and is in jail facing multiple charges including simple assault and recklessly endangering. His bail is $75,000.

ABUSE OF THE 911 SYSTEM

A Williamsport woman reportedly called 911 for no legitimate reason, according to police. As reported by Sun Gazette, Morrisa Stutzman allegedly called 911 a total of 16 times during a five hour period beginning on Feb 2 at 11:20 pm. According to police, Stutzman has been charged with abusing the 911 system, a misdemeanor, and disorderly conduct. She appeared before District Judge Christian Frey and  remains jailed in lieu of $2,500 bail.

 

UPDATED COVID CASES ADDED YESTERDAY

The Pennsylvania Department of Health on Tuesday reported new cases. Clinton County reported 11 new cases. Centre County added 11,  Lycoming County added 0 and Tioga added 0. Montour County had a cumulative increase of 10 new cases, while Snyder County added three. Union County had a cumulative reduction of 25 cases, while Northumberland County’s overall total dropped by 14.

 

TWO OUT OF THREE ARRESTED

Two suspects involved in Sunday evening’s Stabbing in Sunbury are in custody.  Sunbury Police report the incident on North Third Street sent two males to the hospital, one in serious condition. Chief Hare credited video surveillance footage the individuals for their identification and subsequent capture. Hare said he was not releasing the names of the individuals until official charges are filed. Hare said the two individuals were captured Monday night and are currently being held under a county probation violation and a state parole violation, as reported by the Daily Item.  Hare said he will release more information on the stabbing incident in the coming days.

 

BUDGET TIME FOR THE FINAL TIME

Gov. Tom Wolf’s eighth and final budget address sounded upbeat tones of money surpluses and past accomplishments, but local lawmakers heard discordant messages. Wolf’s nearly half-hour long speech included calls for an increase in the state’s minimum wage, investments in education and infrastructure, payment of debts and cooperation in state government. He noted the state’s budget surplus and a $2.8 billion rainy day fund amounting to the state’s highest ever. Wolf noted in his speech that Pennsylvania has not hiked its hourly minimum wage of $7.25 in 13 years, while surrounding states have gone ahead and raised starting wages for workers.

RESIGNATION FROM POSITION

At the Old Lycoming Township Board of Supervisors meeting last evening, the supervisors accepted the resignation of Chief Chris Kriner from his positon as Old Lycoming Township Police Chief. Chief Kriner stated he would resume his position he held prior to being Chief .. That position was Sargent/Detective.  The chief also noted that he would be responsible for the position until another chief is hired.

HIGHLIGHTS OF GOV. TOM WOLF’S 2022-23 BUDGET PLAN

Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf’s spending plan for Pennsylvania’s 2022-23 fiscal year that starts July 1 includes highlights in education: The governor’s spending plan requests about $1.8 billion more for instruction, operations and special education in public schools, or about 21% more and $200 million annually to fund scholarships for students at a State System of Higher Education university if they remain in Pennsylvania for as long as they receive the benefit. Scholarship money would be targeted to high-demand degree programs and finally, the spending play establishes a statewide cyber-charter school tuition rate of $9,800 per student that would save $199 million a year for school districts and changes special education reimbursements for charter schools to save another $174 million a year for school districts.

 

EX-BUCKNELL FOOTBALL COACH SETTLES AGE DISCRIMINATION SUIT AGAINST UNIVERSITY

An age discrimination and false representation lawsuit filed Sunday in U.S. Middle District Court was settled against Bucknell University.  According to an online media outlet, Joseph G. Susan Jr, the third-longest coach in Bucknell Football history alleges he was forced out in 2019. According to reports, Susan sued Bucknell August 2020, looking for unspecified compensatory and punitive damages and front and back pay when he claimed he was forced to resign due to age.  Bucknell claimed the decisions were justified and based on multiple factors other than age.

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